Category Archives: Agricola Lectures

Erasmus’ edition of the Disticha Catonis – Prof. Martin Bloomer

Date and time: 12 June, 16:00-17:00

Venue: Courtroom, Faculty of Theology, Oude Boteringestraat 38

Erasmus’ edition of the Disticha Catonis was one of his greatest printing successes, with over 100 editions printed in his lifetime, not all of course with his approval or participation. He treated this Roman collection of aphorisms as a species of ancient wisdom literature and represented this approach as a radical break from his predecessors’. Erasmus told his readers why his edition was so much better than his rivals. Were these stated principles in fact important for the success of his work? What were his educational goals and his philological methods?  Image result for erasmus

Martin Bloomer is professor at the University of Notre Dame. His chief areas of research lie in Roman literature, ancient rhetoric, and the history of education. His books include Valerius Maximus and the Rhetoric of the New Nobility (Chapel Hill 1993), Latinity and Literary Society at Rome (Philadelphia 1997), The Contest of Language (Notre Dame 2005), The School of Rome (Berkeley 2011), and A Companion to Ancient Education (Chichester and Malden, MA 2015).

This lecture is given in collaboration with the Medieval Research School.

Comments Off on Erasmus’ edition of the Disticha Catonis – Prof. Martin Bloomer

Filed under Agricola Lectures

Chaucer’s London/London’s Chaucer – Paul Strohm

Time and venue: 7 June, Offerhauszaal, Academy Building, 17:00-18:00

Prof. Strohm is the Anna S. Garbedian Professor Emeritus of the Humanities at the Department of English & Comparative Literature in Columbia University, New York. He was previously J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Oxford. His publications include: Social Chaucer (Harvard, 1994); Hochon’s Arrow: The Social Imagination of Fourteenth-Century Texts (Princeton, 1992); England’s Empty Throne: Usurpation and Textual Legitimation, 1399-1422 (Yale, 1998) and Theory and the Premodern Text (Minnesota, 2000).

PosterDesign7 (002)

Comments Off on Chaucer’s London/London’s Chaucer – Paul Strohm

Filed under Agricola Lectures

Hadewijch’s ‘books’? Tracing the (non-)publication tactics of a thirteenth-century beguine writer – Veerle Fraeters

18 January, Courtroom, Faculty of Theology, Oude Boteringestraat 38, 14:30-16:30

Veerle Fraeters is Professor at the Ruusbroec Institute of the University of Antwerp. She specializes in medieval mysticism, with a special focus on the Middle Dutch tradition, on visionary literature, on women authors and on the Brabantine mystic Hadewijch. Recent publications include, as author, the chapter ‘Visio’ in the Cambridge Companion to Christian Mysticism (2012), and, as editor (with M.-E. Gongora and Th. de Hemptinne), the volume Speaking to the Eye. Sight and Insight through Text and Image (1150-1650) (Brepols, 2013) and (with Imke de Gier), Mulieres Religiosae: Shaping Female Spiritual Authority in the Medieval and Early Modern Times (Brepols, 2014). She is editor, with Frank Willaert, of the new edition with Dutch translation and commentary of Hadewijchs Verzamelde Werken (Complete Works) of which the prize-winning first volume Liederen (Songs) came out in 2009 (Historische Uitgeverij Groningen).

Comments Off on Hadewijch’s ‘books’? Tracing the (non-)publication tactics of a thirteenth-century beguine writer – Veerle Fraeters

Filed under Agricola Lectures

Surprised by Joy: Scholarly Discoveries in Latin Medical Literature, 800-1200 – Eliza Glaze

Venue and time: 12 December, Courtroom, Faculty of Theology, Oude Boteringestraat 38, 14:30-16:30 (note time)

Speaker: Prof. Eliza Glaze (Professor of  History,  Coastal Carolina University, USA)

Abstract: Specializing in the articulation of new knowledge based upon the evidence of medieval Latin medical manuscripts and healthscapes, Prof. Glaze’s research explores the processes by which medical knowledge was transmitted from the ancient Mediterranean into Western Europe via classroom experiences, textual media and contextualized practices. Her ultimate interest is two-fold: to recover and identify the transmission, interpretations and use of specialized material from the Mediterranean world, and to explore the social aspects of medical thought and practice manifest in surviving codices.

Masterclass: Prof. Glaze’s lecture will be preceded by a masterclass from 11:15, which is intended for REMA and PhD-students. If you would like to participate, please contact mathilde.van.dijk@rug.nl.

Comments Off on Surprised by Joy: Scholarly Discoveries in Latin Medical Literature, 800-1200 – Eliza Glaze

Filed under Agricola Lectures

‘Eckhart and the Layman’ in female religious milieus – John van Engen

Venue and time: 31 October, Courtroom, Faculty of Theology, Oude Boteringestraat 38, 16:00-17:15

Van Engen, a renowned expert in the Devotio Moderna and late medieval piety, returns to Groningen to give a lecture about the pseudo-Eckhartian treatise Eckhart and the Layman. Specifically, he will explore its connections to female religious milieus.

John van Engen is the Andrew V. Tackes Professor of Medieval History at the University of Notre Dame where he was director of its Medieval Institute. His works include Religion in the History of the Medieval West (2004) and Sisters and Brothers of the Common Life: The Devotio Moderna and the World of the Late Middle Ages (2008).

Comments Off on ‘Eckhart and the Layman’ in female religious milieus – John van Engen

Filed under Agricola Lectures

Child murder accusation against Jews: the Vita et passio Willelmi Norwicensis – Miri Rubin

Wednesday, 5 October, Faculty of Theology, Room 253, Oude Boteringestraat 38, 16:30-18:00

The birth of the child murder accusation against Jews, associated with the Vita et passio Willelmi Norwicensis

Miri Rubin, Queen Mary University London

Miri Rubin is Professor of Medieval and Early Modern History at QMUL. Her publications include: Corpus Christi: the Eucharist in Late Medieval Culture (1991), Gentile Tales; the Narrative Assault on Late Medieval Jews (2004), Mother of God. A History of the Virgin Mary (2009), and trans. with an introduction, Thomas of Monmouth, The Life and Passion of William of Norwich (2014).

Miri Rubin’s Edition of The Life and Passion of William of Norwich

Comments Off on Child murder accusation against Jews: the Vita et passio Willelmi Norwicensis – Miri Rubin

Filed under Agricola Lectures

Amsterdam and its Holy Place – Charles Caspers, Radboud University

6 June, 16:00, Faculty of Theology, Oude Boteringestraat 38, room 125

During the Late Middle Ages religious life in Western Europe was increasingly influenced by Eucharistic devotion. Among these influences local cults, arising from a ‘Eucharistic miracle’, played important roles. These miracles involved a .remarkable, inexplicable occurrence with the consecrated host or wine. Amsterdam also had a devotion of this sort, a so-called ‘Sacrament of Miracle’. In 1345, in this Dutch city, a Host lay for hours in a fireplace without being consumed by the fire; hence the site of the miracle became the  ‘Holy Place’. From its inception, the devotion seems to have been a factor in interests of its devotees, the municipal authorities, the Counts of Holland and later on even the Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire.

Charles Caspers  works in the Titus Brandsma Institute. His most recent monograph is Zacht doch krachtdadig: Anna Catharina van Hees en de oorsprong van de Congregatie Dochters van Maria en Joseph (2015).

Comments Off on Amsterdam and its Holy Place – Charles Caspers, Radboud University

Filed under Agricola Lectures

Political Transformations in the Batavian Republic (1750-1850) – Joris Oddens

2 May, 16:00, Faculty of Theology, Oude Boteringestraat 38, room 130

Between 1750 and 1830 the Dutch state developed from an oligarchic republic to an enlightened autocratic monarchy via a short-lasted experiment with representative democracy. During this period, there was an ongoing debate about the right to petition. Political actors and opinion makers addressed the questions to what and whom this right extended and what it meant to have such a right. While theorists of the different types of government had sharply contrasting views on the place of the people in the political process, ideas about petitioning remained remarkably stable.

Dr Joris Oddens works in the Institute for History at the University of Leiden. His areas of expertise include the history of the Enlightenment and the history of the Batavian Republic. His current research project is ‘The Primacy of Local Belonging: Private Papers, Petitioning, and Periodical Press’ which is part of the NWO Free Competition Programme ‘The Persistence of Civic Identities in the Netherlands, 1747-1848’.

Leave a comment

Filed under Agricola Lectures

Double Seminar: Thomas Aquinas as ‘Alter Christus’| Giant Bible Frontispieces and the Hermeneutics of Reading

25 April, 16:00-17:30, Faculty of Theology, Oude Boteringestraat 38, room 130

St Thomas Aquinas: an ‘alter Christus’?   –  Marika Räsänen, University of Turku

Giant Bible Frontispieces and the Hermeneutics of Reading: Some Observations  –  Teemu Immonen (University of Turku)

Dr Marika Räsänen is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Turku. Her lecture proposes a new reading of the image of Thomas Aquinas based on the 14th- and 15th-century hagiographical, liturgical and iconographical sources. This reading suggests that Thomas was represented as a special follower of Christ, an alter Christus, both in the traditional way through hagiographical topoi, and in a more ‘personal’ way as the composer of the texts of Corpus Christi liturgy and even through the fate of his own corpse.

Dr Teemu Immonen is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Turku. His lecture addresses  the 11th-century church reform that gave birth to a particular form of Bible manuscript called Giant Bibles. Several central Italian examples of the genre include a prominent Creation frontispiece before the text of Genesis. Despite the wide scholarly interest that the frontispieces have generated, little attention has been paid to the function of the pictures at the beginning of the biblical text. The paper discusses what these images tell us about the attitudes of their makers towards the book, i.e. Bible, and more specifically towards the reading of the Bible. It addresses the question of the manner in which the images participate in the process of interpreting the text.

Leave a comment

Filed under Agricola Lectures

Sebastain Castellio: Hero of Modern Religious Tolerance? – Hans Martin Kirn

SebastianCastellio.jpg4 April, 16:00, Faculty of Theology, Oude Boteringestraat 38, room 130

In his famous struggle for religious tolerance the French reformed theologian and opponent of Calvin, S. Castellio (1515-1563), focussed on the solution of intra-Christian conflicts and the execution of heretics. However, widely overlooked, references to Jews and Judaism (and also to Islam) played an important role in his argumentation. How did Castellio refer to biblical Judaism? What was his strategy of ‘Judaizing the heretics’? What was the relation with the ‘heretization of the Jews’ in Late Medieval times? These and other questions about religious tolerance in the Reformation period will be discussed.

Hans-Martin Kirn is Professor of Church History at the Protestant Theological University. His research is focused on the history of Central and Western European Protestantism  between the 16th and the 18th centuries.

2 Comments

Filed under Agricola Lectures